Foam Brush vs Bristle Brush: Which Is Better for Your Job?

foam vs bristle brush difference

One secret to getting the right paint job is using the best brush for the work.

With the market loaded with tons of options, I understand it’s pretty hard to choose the one that suits all your purposes.

In general, there are two popular types of brushes. These can be categorized as the traditional bristle brush and other which is more recent foam brush.

Choosing the right one for the job means understanding what each brush is, their differences, and which one is better overall…


What is a Foam Brush?


As the name implies, the foam brush is made from a foam-like sponge material that is solid.

The soft porous foam can absorb the paint much like a sponge and can apply it across a surface (no matter how small or large it is).

The handles of a foam brush are mostly made of wood, although you can find plastic handles as well.

These types of foam made brushes can be extremely easy to use, even for a beginner.


What is a Bristle Brush?


Bristle brushes have been around for many centuries. Originally, they used the hair of animals, mostly hogs, to provide the bristles.

Today, they are mostly made from synthetic fibers, although natural fibers are still used.

The synthetic fibers are mostly polyester or nylon which provides an even application of the paint being used.

Plus, they typically come with wooden handles, although plastic handles are quite common as well.


Foam Paint Brush Vs. Bristle: The Difference


The differences are rather profound between foam and bristle brushes despite their similar size and use.

The most common differences include the following…

1- Brush Strokes:

The most obvious difference is that a bristle brush will show the bristle marks when painting over smooth surfaces, especially when using latex paint over drywall.

On most surfaces, you will see the brush strokes which may be a desired effect.

But if you want a smoother appearance, then a foam brush is preferred.

2- Cost:

A bristle brush tends to be considerably more expensive compared to the foam brush.

This is because the bristles tend to be more difficult to obtain or produce.

3- Durability:

This is where bristle brushes shine as they can be cleaned repeatedly for years before they need replacement.

Although bristle brushes will become less effective over time, especially if used in hot weather for extended periods.

Foam brushes may also be washed repeatedly, but they tend to break down over a much shorter period compared to bristle brushes.

You will have to replace a foam brush more often compared to a bristle brush, but you are paying less for the product.

4- Even Application:

While it may sound counterintuitive, a bristle brush will not only hold more paint but distribute it more evenly compared to a foam brush.

You will need to use a high-quality bristle brush, but the evenness of the coat will be better compared to the foam version.

With foam brushes, they will not hold as much paint and you may have to apply more coats to get the same effect as a bristle brush.

5- Type of Paint:

Another consideration is that which brush you chose will depend on the type of paint that is being used.

While a foam brush can be used with all types of paints and stains, you will need to narrow the selection when it comes to bristle brushes.

Latex or Water-Based Paint:

A synthetic bristle brush tend to be the best when the fibers are made from polyester or nylon.

Staining or Oil-Based Paint:

Here, a natural fiber bristle brush is preferred, although a polyester brush is not a bad choice either. 

Varnish and Other Protective Finishes:

If applying finishes like polyurethane, polyacrylic, varathane, or any other varnish a good quality synthetic bristle brush is often recommended.

However, do not use the expensive bristle brushes as they can be hard and can leave bristle marks on the wood finishes like Minwax polyacrylics.

You can also get the job done using a disposable foam brush but since foam head may contain air it can leave bubbles in your finish when applying.


So, Which Paint Brush is Better for Your Project?


Better is a subjective term when it comes to either bristle or foam brushes.

It will depend on what type of material you are covering, the type of paint being used, and whether you want to see brush strokes or not.

If you want to see brush strokes, then the brush you need to use is obvious. If not, then you might want to select a foam brush.

Although a foam brush generally takes more work and will wear out much faster compared to a bristle brush.

For small projects over smooth surfaces, a foam brush is arguably the best choice.

Especially if you do not mind paying for extra brushes, although they are far less expensive compared to a good bristle brush.

For larger projects, such as painting a wall, a roller is the best because it covers a far wider area compared to either brush.

However, when you paint the trim and areas around windows and doors, a foam or bristle brush may be used. 

The Bottom Line

A good paintbrush is an important part of a tool kit, without which no painter can even think to survive.

With options like foam and bristle brushes, you can easily make your paint project look unique and beautiful.

However, choosing the right one as per your painting style is a key to success when you are working on your painting project.

IMO, it’s best to keep both of them in your tool kit as both of them will serve different purposes and can help get different types of finishing.

FrogTape vs. 3M ScotchBlue Painter’s Tape: Which is Better?

Painter’s tape is one crucial thing you will need when you don’t want to mess up with your paint project. Read more

What Kind of Face Mask Should You Use for Spray Painting?
mask for painting

More than ever, with the constant increase in the hazardous chemicals in the environment, the importance of the respirator mask Read more

What Kind of Paint to Use on Asphalt and Tarmac?
what paint for asphalt

Both asphalt and tarmac are used for pavement, driveways, and most commonly the surfaces of roads. The difference between asphalt Read more

How to DIY Test for Lead Paint in Your Home?
test lead paint

Before being banned in the late 1970s, lead was a common additive to paints. It helped make it more durable Read more

About | Contact | Disclaimer | Privacy Policy | Terms of Use

RepaintNow.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com. Amazon and the Amazon logo are trademarks of Amazon.com, Inc, or its affiliates.

error: Content is protected !!