FrogTape vs. 3M ScotchBlue Painter’s Tape: Which is Better?

FrogTape vs 3M ScotchBlue

Painter’s tape is one crucial thing you will need when you don’t want to mess up with your paint project.

In fact, I always use one for protecting the surfaces and also because I don’t think I have those excellent skills to cut in a straight line.

Besides protecting the trim or baseboard from paint bleeding, it helps me in achieving sharper and crispier paint lines.

However, the problem steps in when it’s about choosing the right painter’s tape for the job.

With such a huge variety of tapes (that comes in different colors and sizes), it’s really confusing to select the one right product that can take care of your project.

From my personal experiences, the two products that I found promising includes FrogTape and 3M ScotchBlue painter’s tape.

In my guide below, I will try to demystify all the details about them.

Also, by comparing the two we will try to figure out which one is better than others, why and in what aspects…


FrogTape vs. 3M ScotchBlue


FrogTape is a well-known painter’s tape that comes from a renowned brand and it stands in clear contrast to 3M ScotchBlue.

However, when it comes to masking up before a paint project you will need to choose the right tape that can protect the areas (like door frames, light socket, baseboards, pipework, etc.) from getting overspray without fail.

Since, a single product cannot suit all purposes it really comes down to what kind of paint you are using and on what surfaces.   

FrogTape Masking Tape

FrogTape Multi Surface Tape comes in 24mm width and in a convenient to use 50-metre roll.

The tape also comes with patented Paintblock technology which is ideally designed for working with emulsion paints.

Although there are a few other FrogTape options (like for gloss and satin paints), FrogTape multi surface tape is what I most commonly use.  

The thing which I like most it is it comes with a storage container that helps you to store the tape without effecting its adhesive qualities.

Unless you are working on the surfaces with direct sunlight, the Frog Tape can be kept intact for about 21 days (before painting).

However, you should remove the tape once you are done with the painting, ideally when the paint is still wet.

3M Scotch Blue Painter’s Tape

The 3M Scotch Blue tape is also of 24mm width and comes with a multi-use roll.

The tape is made up of blue crepe paper which can securely stick to curved or uneven surfaces as well.

Compared to what Frog Tape provides, this comes with medium adhesion and is suitable for wide variety of DIY paint projects around your home such as walls, trim, woodwork, metal or even glass.

The paint can last for 14 days once applied but should be removed once the painting is carried out and it is still wet.

It’s resistant to sunlight and you can keep the tape as long as 14 days once applied to the surface.

Once you are done with painting and the paint is still wet, just remove it effortlessly.


FrogTape vs Scotchblue: Testing & the Result


Well, this was the trickiest part for me!

What I did was, used both these painter’s tapes on the surfaces side by side for a quick comparison.

Since I was painting my wooden door frame (using latex paint) in my living room, I taped around it using both these tapes.

One side with 3M Scotch Blue and the other with Frog Tape.

The door frame I painted for testing, was painted about six years ago.

So, I sanded the bits of peeling paint, cleaned the surface, applied the wood primer and then painted.

After having applied the paint evenly and waiting for about six to seven minutes, I removed the tapes from both the sides.

And guess what…

While both the tapes were quick and easy to remove, the surface that I taped with Frog Tape was much cleaner than 3M.

To my surprise, the 3M Scotch Blue tape removed a bit of wet paint with it and needed a bit of touch up. But that was not the case with Frog Tape.

Although it was not significant, I must say the frog tape delivered a cleaner and sharper straight line with nearly no signs of paint removal or bleed through.

So, for me the clear winner was FrogTape Multi-Surface

With that said, it may not be the case with you.

Maybe you can get cleaner results with 3M tape and I really can’t say much about it.

So, if you want to try both, just go with them and compare the results by trying on small surface first.  

But if you don’t want to think much and want to pick only the one, I must say try using Frog Tape.

The Bottom Line

Using the right masking tape will surely save you time and energy.

Plus, if you choose the right product it will also eliminate the need to touch up due to paint-bleeds and all those sticky residues.

Frog Tape is comparatively expensive but it worked great for me.

It worked exactly the same as they stated on their package.

Kept the paint lines straight, didn’t bleed through and removed with far better results.

And for this, I would hardly suggest any other product when it comes to choosing the right painter’s tape for a DIY paint project.   

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